Arquetopia Spotlight

Arquetopia welcomes artists, writers, art historians, curators, and researchers from all over the world and from a wide variety of disciplines. Below are some testimonials from our past residents.

 

Matthew Couper
Painting and performance

What is your name, and what is your artistic practice?

Matthew Couper. Primarily painting as main artistic practice, but also performance.

What projects are you currently working on?

New paintings for a group exhibition and art fair in New Zealand next year. I’m just about to leave the USA for a month to attend a group exhibition I’m part of – ‘Zoocryptage’ at Crypte Saint Eugiene in Biarritz, France and I’ll be artist in residence at Arthémuse in Normandie, France.

 

What is the most relevant conversation that you remember having during your residency at Arquetopia?

They were all relevant! I think the best aspect of the conversations was getting a range of answers about the history of Puebla and cultural vagaries that helped me to start developing an understanding of the area and history.

What changed after the residency at Arquetopia? 

My time at Arquetopia really piqued my fascination with Mexico and I really want to return and explore more cities! I’m actually still processing a lot of the things I learnt at Arquetopia and researched in Puebla and Mexico City. 

How are artist residencies important to the artistic practice?

Very. From a pragmatic viewpoint, they allow for a concentrated continuity of time towork on your art. Context and location is important too. Being in a new city or country sometimes throws a spanner in the works of your practice and makes you re evaluate your work. It can feed in new information you may not be able to respond to in your own studio context. Being around other artists is also a great time – you get to compare your art, processes and thoughts regarding your art and life in a safe environment.

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Facebook:Matthew Couper StudioInstagram: coupermatthew   Web:: http://www.mattcouper.com 

Mark De Fraeye

Photographer

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What is your name, and what is your artistic practice?

Mark De Fraeye, concerned photographer (autonomous photography & visual ethnology).

What projects are you currently working on?

”The world is my language”, museum archival black & white silver gelatin prints (Korea/Mexico); narrative photography. “The photographic chemical process reveals a meditative artwork”, digital scans printed on Chromaluxe support; autonomous photography. -EUROPALIA Indonesia, exhibitions “Nusa Tengara” Liège and “Ancestors & Rituals” Brussels; visual ethnology (documentary photography).

What is the most relevant conversation that you remember having during your residency at Arquetopia?

The “decisive” moment with Francisco Guevara pointing out the title & statement (El proceso de la memoria) of my exhibition at Fototeca C.J. Mendez Puebla.

What changed after the residency at Arquetopia? 

Obtaining clear eyes & mind (emptiness) on my artistic career (concerned photographer). Photography listens, someone who cannot listen to a photograph is blind (narrative photography).The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.’, Marcel Proust (cf. visual ethnology).

 

How are artist residencies important to the artistic practice?

As an “eye” opener (catcher) on the personal (your own) artistic practice. An unconditional research …

 Viva Arquetopia!!!

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 Web: http://www.mattcouper.com 

 Roberta Massuch

Ceramic sculpture, functional pottery and drawing

 

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What is your name, and what is your artistic practice?

My name is Roberta Massuch. My practice involves three separate, yet completely intertwined ways of working: ceramic sculpture, functional pottery and drawing. In the sculptural work, I construct compositions with minimalist, architectural ceramic forms which are coated with a film of directed or reflected light from adjacent, brightly colored surfaces. Based in color theory, these three-dimensional still lifes address the perception of objects and the spaces between. The pinched functional objects I create also emerge from these observations. Simple vessels with white exterior surfaces are inextricably involved with nearby objects; the surface of one will always affect the perception of another due to shifts in the intensity and direction of light covering the forms.

What projects are you currently working on?

I have a few projects lined up for Fall 2017, in addition to continuing my residency at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, PA and working as the studio technician at Community College of Philadelphia.

•a two person exhibition (with ceramic artist Patrick Coughlin) at Kitchen Table Gallery in Philadelphia, PA

•Emerging Artist at Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show where I will be showing a new body of functional pottery

•Art After Hours + Pop-up Holiday Market, Barnes Museum, Philadelphia, PA

What is the most relevant conversation that you remember having during your residency at Arquetopia?

I remember late in my residency having a conversation with another resident about the importance of giving oneself the freedom to focus on being present instead of being productive. When I am in my studio at The Clay Studio in Philadelphia, I focus on producing work constantly- instead of allowing for the time and space to let ideas wander, to rest, and to grow slowly. I had planned for my 8 week residency to be mostly focused on research, drawing, and documenting. Yet, I still felt an immense amount of self-imposed pressure to be productive in making throughout the residency. The conversation allowed me to reset and let go of that pressure- to reflect on the 6 or 7 weeks of time already spent in Mexico and spend the remaining time really investigating how to be present in the place. The conversation opened up a dialogue about how I could be more present in the act of looking and observing– not only in the architecture in the city of Puebla, but also in my practice moving forward.

What changed after the residency at Arquetopia? 

 I spent most of my time at Arquetopia (Puebla) walking around the city and observing formal qualities of the buildings, light, and shadows around me. Coming back to Philadelphia, I began to noticed parallels between the two urban spaces. But even more importantly, I began to notice that my way of looking had shifted. I had previously been interested in the way light and shadow affects the interior spaces of the buildings we occupy. Upon returning the realized that the focus had begun to shift to the exterior of these spaces– to the gaps, passageways, and stairways.

How are artist residencies important to the artistic practice?

I believe artist residencies are important to the artistic practice because they allow one to be outside of a comfortable, familiar place. This discomfort has the ability to make room for growth in a unique way.

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Sarah Galarneau

printmaking, bookbinding, painting and drawing

 

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What is your name, and what is your artistic practice?

My name is Sarah Galarneau. My artistic practice mostly consists of printmaking and bookbinding, but I also do painting and drawing.

What projects are you currently working on?

I’m not currently working on a specific project, but I have several ideas brewing. I would like to make more print-based wall installations inspired by nature and vegetation, which would continue a phase in my work that I started while at Arquetopia

 

What is the most relevant conversation that you remember having during your residency at Arquetopia?

I wouldn’t say that one particular conversation was the most relevent to me. In retrospect, what feels most relevent is the accumulation of experience, from the small interactions to the longer conversations, especially with the four fantastic female artists that I met there.

What changed after the residency at Arquetopia? 

Arquetopia was my first solo artist residency, and felt like a big step for my art career. I completed a project that I was very satisfied with, and therefore felt confident presenting it in applications. The pieces I worked on while in Puebla are currently being shown at a printmaking biennale (Biennale Internationale d’Estampe Contemporaine de Trois-Rivières, or BIECTR) in my home province of Quebec, Canada. Additionally, I won a prize at the Biennale (Prix Tele-Quebec). I’ve felt very honoured and grateful to receive this recognition, which wouldn’t have happened if I hadn’t been an artist-in-residence at Arquetopia.

How are artist residencies important to the artistic practice?

Residencies provide artists with the time and space to create, but specifically different space, and sometimes your sense of time can be different too. These aspects can be both inspiring and motivating. Both Puebla and Mexico were new places to me, so I was constantly in a state of discovery – a state of being that I feel is not only relevent to my own art, but also to the act of art-making in general.

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We invite you to apply for any of our outstanding residencies via our

Artist-in-Residence Online Application Form.

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